Refining our Mind Body Techniques – An Interview with Steven Hoskinson

In this interview with Steve Hoskinson, a SE practitioner and trainer who studied under Peter Levine, we delve into how to refine the mind body practices and learn some tips to help restart our systems to work properly again.

Product Description

One of the hallmarks of Somatic Experiencing (SE) is the idea that over millions of years of evolution, our bodies have developed the tools to heal themselves from accumulated stress or trauma. In our modern world, many of those physiological systems are being suppressed by a variety of factors.

In this interview with Steve Hoskinson, a SE practitioner and trainer who studied under Peter Levine, we delve into how to refine the mind body practices and learn some tips to help restart our systems to work properly again.

Steve comes from a deep background in psychology but over his life has come to understand that the body exists naturally in an ebb and flow of intensity. His work in SE focuses on guiding us to allow our bodies the freedom and safety to self regulate their own healing from traumatic experience.

The goal of his work is to embrace our intensity so we can learn to flow through our stresses and let our body’s own systems release us from the Fight, Flight and Freeze states that paralyze so many of us.

We cover a WIDE range of topics.

  • Domestication of plants, animals and humans and its role on our current ability to regulate stress.
  • Physiology of the amygdala in our brain and its “smoke detector” nature.
  • Why taking a deeper breath in states of stress fails to re-set our biology to baseline.
  • The need to be careful with various meditative and other attention-based methods so as to not numb out or “anesthetize” our body sensations and emotions.
  • The trauma responses in mind-body practice.

Due to my expertise in teaching attention-based movement (via Feldenkrais), we dive into a discussion around tips and practical application that teachers, as well as students, can do to ensure they remain as present as possible in their minds, and most importantly in their bodies.